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Erik Dalton Blog

Addressing SI Joint Syndrome

In the early 20th century, sacroiliac joint syndrome (SIJ) was the most common medical diagnosis for low back pain, which resulted in that period being labeled the “Era of the SI Joint.” Any pain emanating from the low back, buttock or adjacent leg usually was branded and treated as SIJ.

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Figure 1. Upper Cross Syndrome

Does Weak Posture Really Matter?

https://vimeo.com/401403833 Addressing Postural Plasticity by Erik Dalton In the early 1990s, I had the opportunity to study with legendary neurologist and physiotherapist Vladimir Janda, M.D. He

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Adductors, Pudendal Nerve and Pelvic Floor Pain

Pelvic floor muscles such as levator ani, coccygeus and obturator internus attach to the front, back and sides of the pelvis and sacrum and form the bottom of the core. These muscles must be able to contract to maintain continence, and to relax allowing for urination and bowel movements, and in women, sexual intercourse.

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Memory & Bodywork Mastery

Our brains are very much like sponges. They are malleable and constantly adapting to peripheral input by strengthening existing neural connections and networks, a process called long-term potentiation (LTP).

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Scoliosis… is it functional or structural?

Manual therapists often shy away from treating scoliotic clients, and for good reason. In the absence of a basic understanding of spinal biomechanics, soft tissue work may not produce the desired results and treatments that are too “heavy-handed” may even exacerbate the client’s condition.

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