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SI Joint “Hypermobility” Pain

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Increased outdoor activity during the summer months tends to escalate the number of overuse and traumatic injuries seen in massage and bodywork practices. Increased outdoor activity during the summer months tends to escalate the number of overuse and traumatic injuries seen in massage and bodywork practices. One of the most common of these is sacroiliac joint syndrome. The SI joint is susceptible to traumatic (sudden, forceful injury) and inflammatory conditions. Common causes of injury are slips or falls; however, it also can be “injured” by overuse. Overuse can result from frequent and prolonged bending or sitting for extended periods of time. Occasionally, intense pain can arise from doing something as simple as bending over to pick up a pencil or tie a shoe.

Injuries of this type can produce ligamentous laxity and allow painful abnormal motion. SI joint “hypermobility” pain can also be caused by leg length discrepancy, gait abnormalities, prolonged vigorous exercise, and trauma. In any case, the resulting dysfunction disrupts the kinetic chain in which the SIJ is a key link. Restoring normal function can be extremely challenging but not impossible. Myoskeletal Alignment seeks to restore length-strength balance to muscles and enveloping fascia before compensations lead to gait alterations and subsequent low back, hip and leg pain.

Find out more about Sacroiliac Joint Syndrome.

Click here for more information.

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